New VMware CTO tasked with developing desktop virtualization vision

2017-07-27T00:01:12+00:00 October 1st, 2009|Uncategorized|

vmware-large-logoVMware is perhaps best known today for its VMware ESX server virtualization technology. It is what has helped VMware become synonymous with the virtual datacenter. But 10 years ago the company was probably regarded as a desktop virtualization company. VMware ESX was still in alpha back then, and it wasn’t until a year or so later, with the 1.5 release, that the ESX product had any real legs under it. The company’s Workstation product, on the other hand, was doing quite well; for many, this is where we got our start with the concept of virtualizing on an x86 machine.

VMware still has a number of products for the desktop platform. Workstation, which installs and operates on top of a Linux or Windows operating system, is around and doing quite well, and it’s often used as a proving ground for new technologies making their way up to the server-class products. VMware also introduced a popular sister product for the Mac OS called Fusion, and the company has other products, like Player and ACE, as well as a VDI broker technology now called VMware View. VMware branched out into the application virtualization market with its acquisition of Thinstall (the product is now called VMware ThinApp), but even with all of these other technologies, VMware ESX and vSphere are still the dominant topics of discussion.

But perhaps VMware is now ready to start focusing more on the desktop market while it continues to push forward with its virtual datacenter and cloud story. Where is it planning on taking the desktop? To answer that, we look to Scott Davis, the new CTO of the Desktop Business Unit at VMware. Davis was previously the chief datacenter architect in VMware’s CTO office, and before that, some of you may remember him in the day when he was the president, CTO, and founder of Virtual Iron Software

[4], now acquired by Oracle.

Davis will have his hands full trying to build out a cohesive desktop story and business unit at VMware. With the huge success and uptake that VMware ESX server has had, the desktop technologies at VMware have been second-class citizens. However, Davis has quite a list of interesting technologies with which to set about changing that belief. The question becomes, what will he do with those technologies and what is his vision for the future? In his introductory blog post over at VMware View-Point [5], Davis writes:

VMware’s vision for client or desktop computing is to use virtualization technologies to encapsulate and isolate all the aspects of the desktop.  Make each aspect independently manageable, duplicate-able, recreate-able.  Employee-Owned IT?  Separate into different virtual machines. Lost, broken or obsolete device?  Throw it away, the VM is preserved in the datacenter and can be redeployed at will.

I want the freedom that comes with complete separation between my physical devices and all my software.  I want device independence; my applications, my data, my personality dynamically composited and encapsulated executing on the optimal device(s) for my  current time and location.  That may mean collocating layers on the same device or distributing across multiple systems.  I want isolation; my personal and professional applications, run-time and data isolated and encapsulated, accessible via the internet, mobile devices, thin and thick clients.  With client virtualization I want the display, the computes and the storage intelligently and automatically placed – sometimes it’s better to execute the workload in the datacenter and virtualize the graphics to a client.  Other times, I want to take the whole workload with me and run it on a laptop.  Or something in between.  And why stop there?  We’re also doing best of breed virtualization for isolation and encapsulation between all relevant boundaries – that’s why we have ThinApp for application virtualization and continue to invest in advancing that technology.  And why we announced at VMworld our relationship with RTO to make use of their profile caching and replication technology in our solutions.  And why we partner with Teradici to jointly bring solutions to market based on the best in class remote graphics protocol designed explicitly for virtualized desktops.  And there’s a lot more coming!

VMware is calling this new desktop vision “User-Centric Computing” and describes it as “the intersection of our virtualization technologies, management platform, and the demands of client computing.”

Davis sums up his belief: “As has been proven for servers, virtual desktops are really better than physical ones. And that’s our viewpoint!”

He certainly doesn’t have to convince me or this audience that the virtual is better than the physical. Most of us are like-minded, or we wouldn’t be here. However, Davis’ group has a long way to go to give us a clear, cohesive, unified view of where the company is going. His vision statement is a good start, but there are still way too many questions left unanswered and VMware’s desktop vision has been without a voice for way too long. I look forward to seeing what Davis has up his sleeve.

Source: Infoworld.com By David Marshall

VMware’s CTO Sketches Mobile Virtual Desktop Strategy

2017-07-27T00:01:12+00:00 September 20th, 2009|Uncategorized|

VMware, which already has the largest share of the server virtualization market, is building on its technology base to bring desktop virtualization to any end-user device, including iPhones or other mobile devices.

That’s the word from Steve Herrod, CTO, VMware, who recently discussed in depth how VMware is taking advantage of its vSphere offering to expand virtualization beyond the server to any user device and into the cloud.

Herrod spoke before an audience at the VMworld 2009 conference, held this week in San Francisco.

vSphere 4 is VMware’s technology for server virtualization, and is the base on which the company’s cloud computing strategy is built.

Moving to a virtual desktop infrastructure has become less about desktop-centric technology and more about how it impacts the users, especially as companies look at the importance of privacy issues and an increasingly mobile workforce, Herrod said.

At the same time, a successful virtual desktop strategy requires that the user experience closely match what the user expects from his or her current desktop devices. "If their experience isn’t as good as possible, your customers will hear about it," he said.

Herrod said that vSphere has several components that make it ideal for developing a virtual desktop infrastructure, including a common set of tools for server and desktop virtualization, proven availability for disaster recovery, a proven set of security tools and proven virtualization efficiency.

In addition, vSphere also offers centralized management capabilities, including provisioning of virtual devices, the ability to update and patch those devices and the enforcement of company policies, including security, he said.

VMware is continuing to update its virtual desktop in a number of ways, Herrod said.

Herrod on Wednesday unveiled a new OEM agreement with RTO Software, the Alpharetta, Ga.-based developer of software that improved the performance of virtual desktops and thin clients.

VMware is using an RTO technology called Virtual Profilers with its VMware View desktop virtualization technology to separate the operating system, application and personality components of a virtual desktop in order to modify or patch any of these components without impacting the others.

For instance, Herrod said, using RTO, a company can create a separate master image of the operating system used in multiple virtual desktops and patch that master image, with the changes applied to those virtual desktops, without impacting their applications or their users’ desktop personalities.

VMware also is working with Teradici, of Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada, to develop products that use the PC-over-IP, or PCoIP, protocol, Herrod said. VMware will ship products with a software version of the PCoIP later this year to increase the performance of mobile and remote users who use virtual desktops, he said. He also expects other vendors to start shipping hardware-based PCoIP products for high-performance applications.

VMware and its partners also are continuing to develop new capabilities to make it easier for mobile device users to get a virtual desktop experience using any device.

Herrod said VMware’s mobile strategy includes using mobile phones as thin clients, as devices for doing remote management and as virtual PCs. The result is end-user freedom to work on any device, and a reduction in management issues by corporate IT departments, which are increasingly forced to deal with multiple types of user devices.

For instance, Herrod and another VMware colleague demonstrated PocketCloud, an application from Wyse Technology, San Jose, Calif., that turns an Apple iPhone into a mobile thin client device that can be used to access virtual desktop PCs from anywhere.

VMware and credit card giant Visa also demonstrated VMware’s yet-to-be-released virtual mobile phone technology, which allows multiple virtual devices to reside on a single mobile phone and be accessed by clicking on the appropriate icon.

In the Visa application, which included a separate operating system from that of the mobile phone itself, a user is alerted any time his or her Visa card is swiped, and can receive new promotional offers based on his or her buying history. The application also used Google Maps to pull up a map showing the location of local ATMs.

"So together, we’ll make it easier to spend money wherever you are," Herrod said.

Source: CRN.com

By Joseph F Kovar, ChannelWeb

Wyse Technology Improves Virtual Desktop Environments with New Flash Acceleration Technology

2017-07-27T00:01:13+00:00 September 18th, 2009|Uncategorized|

Wyse Technology, the global leader in thin computing and client virtualization, today officially announced its new acceleration solution for Adobe Flash, as part of its incredibly popular TCX virtualization software suite.  The new functionality improves the end user experience on virtual desktops by solving the Flash content quality challenge for VDI and Terminal Services environments.

Wyse TCX Flash Acceleration“Every end user wants the performance of their thin client to be as good as or better than their PC,” according to Mark Bowker, Analyst, Enterprise Strategy Group.  “Wyse has been steadily deploying software as part of its TCX suite toward that end and the addition of Flash acceleration capabilities will help accelerate virtual desktop adoption.” 

With Flash applications abundant in all industry verticals, especially financial services and education, customers are thrilled that the content acceleration challenge has been solved without compromising the end user experience. 

Offered as part of the Wyse TCX virtualization software suite, the new Flash acceleration extends the capabilities of the Microsoft RDP and Citrix ICA/HDX protocols for Flash Player 9 and 10 and Internet Explorer 6 and 7.  Compatibility with VMware View and Citrix XenDesktop connection brokers, using Windows XP Pro, Vista or Windows 7 completes the solution. 

“Wyse continues to innovate and stretch the capabilities of their thin clients to provide a rich virtual desktop experience,” said Sumit Dhawan, vice president, product marketing, XenDesktop product group at Citrix Systems.  “Wyse technologies perfectly complement and extend Citrix HDX technologies to deliver an excellent, high-definition user experience and expand the ability of IT to offer virtual desktops to a wide variety of users.”

With Flash acceleration, end users’ animation, online training, YouTube, and video-rich Web sites are now seamlessly presented.

“Thin client customers using sites like CNN.com and NYSE MarkeTRAC with Flash-based tickers, are significantly improved by Wyse’s new Flash content acceleration capabilities,” says Param Desai, Product Manager at Wyse Technology.  “Flash acceleration continues our efforts to make the thin client user experience even better than a PC.”

Pricing and Availability
Flash acceleration will be commercially available in October 2009, available on Wyse’s V class and R class thin clients with Windows XP Embedded, Windows Embedded Standard 2009, or Wyse ThinOS operating systems, and supported PCs.  For more information on Flash acceleration and Wyse TCX, please visit http://www.wyse.com/products/software/tcx/

About Wyse Technology

Wyse Technology is the global leader in thin computing-based virtualization software and hardware solutions. Wyse and its strategic partners, including, Citrix®, IBM®, Microsoft®, Novell®, VMware®, and others deliver the innovative hardware, infrastructure software, and services that formulate the benefits of cloud computing, virtualization and Green IT. These thin computing solutions allow consumers, public and private enterprises to access the application information they need, but with better security, manageability, and at a much lower total cost of ownership than a PC. Wyse is headquartered in San Jose, California, with offices worldwide.

Wyse Technology, the global leader in thin computing and client virtualization, today officially announced its new acceleration solution for Adobe Flash, as part of its incredibly popular TCX virtualization software suite.  The new functionality improves the end user experience on virtual desktops by solving the Flash content quality challenge for VDI and Terminal Services environments.

“Every end user wants the performance of their thin client to be as good as or better than their PC,” according to Mark Bowker, Analyst, Enterprise Strategy Group.  “Wyse has been steadily deploying software as part of its TCX suite toward that end and the addition of Flash acceleration capabilities will help accelerate virtual desktop adoption.” 

With Flash applications abundant in all industry verticals, especially financial services and education, customers are thrilled that the content acceleration challenge has been solved without compromising the end user experience. 

Offered as part of the Wyse TCX virtualization software suite, the new Flash acceleration extends the capabilities of the Microsoft RDP and Citrix ICA/HDX protocols for Flash Player 9 and 10 and Internet Explorer 6 and 7.  Compatibility with VMware View and Citrix XenDesktop connection brokers, using Windows XP Pro, Vista or Windows 7 completes the solution. 

“Wyse continues to innovate and stretch the capabilities of their thin clients to provide a rich virtual desktop experience,” said Sumit Dhawan, vice president, product marketing, XenDesktop product group at Citrix Systems.  “Wyse technologies perfectly complement and extend Citrix HDX technologies to deliver an excellent, high-definition user experience and expand the ability of IT to offer virtual desktops to a wide variety of users.”

With Flash acceleration, end users’ animation, online training, YouTube, and video-rich Web sites are now seamlessly presented.

“Thin client customers using sites like CNN.com and NYSE MarkeTRAC with Flash-based tickers, are significantly improved by Wyse’s new Flash content acceleration capabilities,” says Param Desai, Product Manager at Wyse Technology.  “Flash acceleration continues our efforts to make the thin client user experience even better than a PC.”

Pricing and Availability
Flash acceleration will be commercially available in October 2009, available on Wyse’s V class and R class thin clients with Windows XP Embedded, Windows Embedded Standard 2009, or Wyse ThinOS operating systems, and supported PCs.  For more information on Flash acceleration and Wyse TCX, please visit http://www.wyse.com/products/software/tcx/

About Wyse Technology

Wyse Technology is the global leader in thin computing-based virtualization software and hardware solutions. Wyse and its strategic partners, including, Citrix®, IBM®, Microsoft®, Novell®, VMware®, and others deliver the innovative hardware, infrastructure software, and services that formulate the benefits of cloud computing, virtualization and Green IT. These thin computing solutions allow consumers, public and private enterprises to access the application information they need, but with better security, manageability, and at a much lower total cost of ownership than a PC. Wyse is headquartered in San Jose, California, with offices worldwide.

Source: Wyse.com

Desktop Virtualization: Will Free Upgrades Give Citrix the Edge?

2017-07-27T00:01:13+00:00 September 17th, 2009|Uncategorized|

The set of virtual desktop system enhancements Citrix Systems announced this week is unusual not for its timing or technical acumen, but for focusing on the experience of actual end users. Analysts say that IT knows the user experience with desktop virtualization is absolutely critical to success.

“We did a study that came out just before VMworld

[in August] that showed the quality of the user experience is the top criterion enterprises use to evaluate virtual desktop infrastructures,” says Andi Mann, head of systems and storage-management research at Enterprise Management Associates.

“The end user experience is critical, and there are some really clever things in what Citrix is doing address that — multiple ways to deploy desktop services and to improve performance enough to fundamentally improve what the users are actually doing,” Mann says.

Asked to rate the most important factor in choosing a desktop virtualization system, out of 10 options, 75 percent of companies chose “Ease of use for end-users.”

Citrix’s New Improvements for End Users

The improvements—in load-balancing at the server, support for graphics and peripherals at the client, and an additional way to virtualize a desktop application—come free for customers with existing enterprise license or automatic-upgrade contracts.

The most notable new feature in XenApp 5 Feature Pack 2, which is free to customers with enterprise licenses and upgrade-by-subscription plans, is VM Hosted Apps. The feature allows Citrix customers to run desktop applications on a separate virtual machine that runs on a physical host running XenServer.

Most desktop applications running under XenApps run in parallel on a Windows or Xen server. XenApps clients connect by logging in to the server and using software already running on it.

With Dynamic Application Delivery, a single application or a specific user’s whole suite of applications run on a VM without having to share resources, and without having any difficulty identifying the hardware or operating system on which they run, according to Alicia Rey, product marketing manager for XenApp.

“That’s actually a big deal because there are a small percentage of applications, maybe only five to ten percent, that you wouldn’t even think to run on XenApps,” says Ben Kohn, senior systems architect for Independent Bank, an Ionia, Mich.-based bank with 1,200 employees, 90 percent of whom are connected via Citrix virtual desktops, accessing software running mostly on VMware servers.

“Adobe Acrobat, for example, installs a service that checks on the hardware you’re running it on so you don’t move it around to different machines,” Kohn says. “You couldn’t put it on Citrix server or do app streaming with it, but you could install it on a VM and deliver it that way and still use exactly the same infrastructure you would for any other app.”

A second feature, HDX MediaStream for Flash, is designed to make graphics-intensive applications run faster by using, where possible, the memory, CPU cycles and graphics card on the end-user’s computer in addition to those on the server, Rey says. Currently XenApps only presents an image of what’s going on at the server—which Kohn calls the “equivalent of a really long video cable.”

Adding a layer of intelligence to the client software to enable it to check for and use local graphics resources takes some load off the server and, more importantly, makes the application appear to the end user to be running faster, Mann says.

Rey says traditional Terminal Services-based Citrix connections are still more secure and cost-effective, but that VM-based VDI gives users the chance to also virtualize resource-intensive applications, or legacy software that doesn’t run well in a communal environment.

Mixed Vendor Environments The Norm

That is the second big hit of this round of improvements, Mann says. There are few consistent trends in desktop virtualization except that widespread acceptance of it is at least three years later than user surveys predicted and that organizations that have implemented it have done so in many ways.

“Enterprises tend to deploy between four or five different endpoint virtualization technologies on average, and almost a quarter deploy more than six different technologies simultaneously,” Mann says. “End-user companies are adopting multiple technologies, so vendors interested in that market have to provide integration between them.”

The two leading approaches (with a penetration of 70 percent each) are to run applications on a server and let users access them through a Web browser, and the more traditional Virtual Desktop Infrastructure, in which users access full desktop functions on a server using Terminal Services or accessing a VM on a shared server, Mann’s study shows.

Despite the variety of implementations, 100 percent of the companies EMA surveyed reported some positive outcome from virtualized desktops. Almost 75 percent reported measureable cost reductions and more than half reported functional benefits such as improving staff mobility or flexibility, security, or business continuity plans.

One Bank’s Desktop Virtualization Strategy for Success

The XenApp 5 Feature Pack 2 also includes power and capacity management features that are designed to allow IT to create rules describing when and how to add or delete virtual machines to keep the servers running efficiently. A capacity planning feature is designed to let IT managers not only estimate capacity demands for certain situations, but also run simulations of each setup through tests to see if capacity plans will break.

“Right now if we have a spike in demand for a particular app, our provisioning services will spin up more VMs to account for it and that would only take about 15 or 20 minutes. But it’s 15 or 20 minutes after everybody [end users] have started to feel the pain,” Kohn says. “That’s a gap that we really appreciate they’re trying to fill, to adjust capacity automatically.”

Independent Bank has been hurt less than most other banks by the 12-month economic downturn, but it has been tightening its belt and only spending money on technology where it can significantly improve efficiency and stability, according to Peter Graves, the company CIO.

This year that’s included spending “a couple of million, all told,” on a new storage area network, disaster-recovery strategy, DR site and appliances that could have the bank back online in hours rather than days, and upgrades to its 10-year-old Citrix network.

“It takes so many of our resources to maintain our network that we would like to be able to divert some of those resources to other things by making the infrastructure more efficient,” Graves says.

MediaStream for Flash could significantly pare back the $400,000 or so the bank spends to refresh desktop hardware every year. Rather than replace old PCs that act as thin clients, the feature may allow the bank to leave those machines in place and make use of memory and CPU capacity that have been wasted until now, Graves says.

The Competition with VMware, Microsoft

Features like that—as well as XenApps’ continuing superiority over VMware’s desktop virtualization technology in a feature called context switching that is used heavily by servers supporting VDI, but less so by those running server-based applications—will probably keep Citrix ahead of its competitors both in the market and at Independent Bank, Kohn says.

“We tested them head to head and Citrix, which is optimized for context switching, had something like a 25 percent advantage over VMware,” Kohn says. “ESX performs so well on the server side, though, that we’re pretty entrenched there. There are a lot of features in disaster recovery and management and business continuity planning that Citrix is still catching up on.”

That may be clear for Kohn and Graves, but most of the rest of the market will be roiled by efforts by Microsoft, VMware, Citrix and a steadily growing number of competitors hoping desktop virtualization is finally ready to become a market-dominating reality, Mann says.

“VMware is doing some great things under the covers and with partnerships and other areas, but they don’t have the variety of delivery mechanisms that Citrix has, or the focus on enhancing the endpoint, which is a real advantage,” Mann says. “Things like the policy based load balancing, some very large, mature customers of Citrix will love; mostly, I suspect, that’s not as important as having more ways to deliver apps to the user and deliver a better user experience.”

Source: CIO.com – Kevin Fogarty

Citrix Live – Secrets Lies and VDI

2017-07-27T00:01:13+00:00 September 17th, 2009|Uncategorized|

Event Overview VDI is one of the hottest buzzwords in the technology industry and IT executives are looking for a clear understanding of what it means. CitrixLive! is a not-to-miss event that will decode the myths and uncover the truth about VDI to give you a clear, strategic view of desktop virtualization and make all its benefits available to you today.Desktop virtualization is more than just VDI. It is about desktops, applications, personalization, the best user experience and much, much more. At CitrixLive!, you’ll get a complete understanding of what desktop virtualization really means.

CitrixLive! will include a keynote and sessions from leading Citrix and industry experts along with booths from a wide range of partners and sponsors. As an attendee you will have access to downloadable resources to help drive toward next steps on executing your desktop virtualization strategy.

Attend CitrixLive! to get a 360 degree view on desktop virtualization that will shed new light on the technology, change your perceptions and turn the industry on its head.

Don’t miss out. Register now.

Agenda Citrix Desktop Virtualization strategy and vision revealed

Gordon Payne, senior vice president and general manager, Citrix

Struggling to keep pace with the increasing complexity of desktops, applications, devices and user needs? The power to virtualize is right here, right now with Citrix. Hear first hand our vision for desktop virtualization and discover the Power of One: the ability to manage one copy of each application, one desktop OS image, one profile for each user, one password-identity-it is that simple.Secret: You can radically simplify desktop management.
Battle
of CTOs: Server virtualization vs. Desktop virtualization

Harry Labana, chief technology officer, Citrix and Simon Crosby, chief technology officer, Citrix

VDI is booming and so is the confusion surrounding it. Desktop vs. server. User centric vs. datacenter centric. Pilot vs. large scale implementation. The list goes on and on. Watch two Citrix thought leaders go head to head in examining the differences and similarities of server and desktop virtualization. Explore key considerations for selecting a solution and get an in-depth look at how VDI offerings compare.Truth: Desktop virtualization is different than server virtualization.
The fastest, most powerful XenApp yet

Mick Hollison, Vice President, Citrix

From new and innovative delivery methods to improved management capabilities to high definition experience, XenApp continues to get better with every release. Discover the latest in XenApp and explore how to deliver more applications as cost-effective, on-demand services to any user, anywhere.Truth: XenApp is the de facto industry standard in application virtualization.
What’s coming with XenDesktop

Sumit Dhawan, vice president, Citrix


Next generation desktop virtualization technologies are being unveiled. Learn about the latest innovations in XenDesktop and how you can leverage the infrastructure that you already have to start delivering virtual desktops now. One solution for any hypervisor, any delivery method, any LAN or WAN, and any device. You don’t want to miss it.Secret: Can’t tell you just yet, attend and find out.
Ensure users get a high definition experience with virtual desktops

Derek Thorslund, senior product manager, Citrix and Sridhar Mullapudi, senior product manager, Citrix

Starting with the user in mind is how you can differentiate your IT organization. Get the facts about what you can now do with virtual desktops and Citrix HDX technologies to enable you to deliver the best user experience without compromise. Learn how to architect your environment for LAN and WAN and how the various technologies work in harmony on any device, on any network, with better reliability and higher availability than a traditional PC.Truth: The HDX difference is the Citrix difference.
Simple, user driven desktops and enterprise app
store is the future

Orestes Melgarejo, senior director, Citrix


Brokers and Web Interface are a thing of the past. See how you can maintain IT control and give your users simple and intuitive access to their desktops through an enterprise app store that lets them choose what they need, when they need it-applications, desktop or any IT-delivered service. Don’t wait for the future, build your plan to embrace it.Truth: Only Citrix Receiver radically simplifies desktop management for IT and gives users flexibility and independence in how and where they work.
Add XenDesktop to your XenApp environment  the
fast and reliable way

Calvin Hsu, Director, Citrix

Desktop virtualization is being deployed enterprise-wide and is ready for mainstream adoption. Why wait? XenApp customers can quickly add desktop virtualization to their environment. Get an in-depth view of how to leverage existing skill sets, infrastructure and best practices to extend the benefits of centralization to the entire Windows desktop.Secret: Implementing desktop virtualization into your existing environment is easier than you think.
Architectural blueprint for a successful desktop virtualization solution

Dan Feller, lead architect consulting services, Citrix

Are you contemplating adding desktop virtualization to your environment but aren’t sure how to get there? Get an in-depth view from an expert who architected the solution. Learn the secrets and explore best practices for setting up a scalable solution that gives you complete flexibility to host virtual desktops on multiple virtualization platforms. With Citrix XenDesktop, it’s all about giving customers the freedom to choose.Truth: XenDesktop works with XenServer, Microsoft Hyper-V or VMware ESX.

Gartner says Worldwide Hosted Virtual Desktop Market to Surpass $65 Billion in 2013

2017-07-27T00:01:13+00:00 September 14th, 2009|Uncategorized|

gartner logoThe worldwide hosted virtual desktop (HVD) market will accelerate through 2013 to reach 49 million units, up from more than 500,000 units in 2009, according to Gartner Inc. Worldwide HVD revenue will grow from about $1.3 billion to $1.5 billion in 2009, which is less than 1 percent of the worldwide professional PC market, to $65.7 billion in 2013, which will be equal to more than 40 percent of the worldwide professional PC market.

“PC vendors must prepare for the growth in demand for this client computing architecture by adjusting sales strategies and compensation models or they risk losing expenditure share with enterprise customers,” said Annette Jump, research director at Gartner. “Distributed computing has been the dominant client computing architecture for the past 15 to 20 years, but a number of changes in the way users can access applications and client computing capabilities are bringing a number of alternative architectures to the fore.

“Hosted virtual desktops are currently the most visible of these alternative architectures and HVD adoption is likely to be rapid during the next three to five years, particularly in mature markets where existing data center and network infrastructures will be used to offset the cost of entry,” said Brian Gammage, vice president and Gartner fellow.

This trend will have a major impact on the PC industry where enterprises that previously purchased high volumes of desktop PCs on a regular basis will now look to replace some desktop PCs with less-expensive devices and replace them less frequently. However, while PC hardware expenditure will fall in this scenario, these enterprises will require more servers, network bandwidth and software to support the new architectures.

Gartner estimates that approximately 15 percent of current worldwide traditional professional desktop PCs will migrate to HVDs by 2014, equal to about 66 million connected devices. The U.S. will reach double that of the worldwide average with over 18 million connected devices. After an initial slow start, the HVD market will rally in 2010 and 2011.

“Despite the further improvements in performance and manageability that are expected of HVDs in 2009, the current economic downturn is expected to inhibit the adoption of HVDs in the short term because HVD deployments require large upfront investments in server and network infrastructure,” Ms. Jump said. “Because of IT budget cuts, we expect many planned HVD implementations to be delayed from 2009 into 2010 and 2011.”

The current players in the HVD market come mainly from thin-client and virtualization IT areas. The largest PC vendors currently do not offer HVDs; however, some of them, such as HP and Dell, are looking to expand their presence in the segment beyond acting as hardware OEMs. Gartner expects that the HVD market will be heavily influenced by market leader VMware through 2012 and also predicts that Microsoft will become a HVD supplier in the next 18 to 24 months through its partnership with Citrix, which has the ability to offer a growing number of HVD components.

Ms Jump advised PC vendors looking to maintain their share in the professional desktop market to become solution providers and understand that the HVD solution goes beyond hardware sales. She said that to become a HVD supplier, PC vendors need to offer multiple components such as server virtualization software to host desktop software, session management software to connect users with their desktop environment and tools for managing the provision of virtual desktops.

“HVDs are part of a bigger shift in client computing from traditional thick-client distributed PCs toward more manageable, secure and centralized client computing environments among many large and midsize companies,” Mr. Gammage said. “To benefit from this shift, PC vendors don’t need to create or even own all the components themselves, but they do need to be able to sell solutions and not just a ‘bag of bits’.”

Gartner analysts said once PC vendors have the HVD solutions in place, they need to ensure that their direct sales force is fully briefed about HVD technology and the difference in value propositions versus traditional desktop PC sales as HVDs may not ultimately be appropriate for all business applications and/or users. At the same time, the channel will also need re-educating about components of HVD and selling HVD solutions. Alliances to promote and provide proper education about HVD solutions will help drive demand and growth for those solutions among business organizations.

Source: www.gartner.com

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