Symantec Launches Hosted Medical Image Archiving and Sharing

2017-07-27T00:01:09+00:00 August 12th, 2010|Uncategorized|

Symantec offers healthcare providers hosted solutions to reduce storage costs and streamline medical image sharing

Symantec Corp. (Nasdaq: SYMC) announced Symantec Health, a new hosted medical image archiving and sharing solution for healthcare providers, that helps lower storage costs and provides secure, Web-based image sharing for non-affiliated hospitals and physicians. The new Symantec Health Safe solution consists of two components: Symantec Health Safe and Symantec Health Image Share.

With medical images increasing in volume and density and longer retention periods occurring, storage costs are growing exponentially. Many IT organizations struggle to accurately budget and fund on-site storage. Symantec Health Safe addresses the high cost of storage by providing affordable capacity on-demand and business continuity.

“Health IT executives continually cite the soaring costs associated with medical image storage as one of the biggest challenges they face,” said Lori Wright, vice president and general manager of the Electronic Health Group at Symantec. “Symantec’s security and storage management expertise and its leading Software as a Service portfolio are key reasons why many healthcare industry leaders trust Symantec to deliver these new hosted offerings in a cost-effective and secure way.”

According to Rick Schooler, vice president and chief information officer of Orlando Health, a 1,800 bed hospital system in Orlando, FL, “Symantec has been able to create an affordable alternative to onsite storage to help reduce image archiving costs and capital expenses while enhancing business continuity. A key advantage of Symantec Health is its surprisingly quick deployment and integration with the existing Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS).”

In addition, Symantec Health Image Share enables healthcare providers to confidently share images and reports with non-affiliated hospitals and physicians over the Internet, reducing the inconvenience and costs associated with CDs and DVDs used in many organizations today.

“Symantec offers secure image sharing that is like a social network for healthcare—one clinician can invite another clinician to view images without having to implement complex interfaces,” said Dr. John Halamka, chief information officer of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, MA.

Key features and benefits of Symantec Health solutions include:

Symantec Health Safe:

  • Affordable and reliable storage to accommodate the growing number and size of medical images
  • Capacity on demand and business analytics to provide budget predictability and control
  • Business continuity to ensure that medical images are secure and available in the event of a business disruption, a disaster or a security breach

Symantec Health Image Share:

  • Ability for non-affiliated clinicians to search, view and download images with a physician-friendly Web interface
  • Secure provider-to-provider image sharing to streamline clinical operations, reduce re-imaging, and enable hospital outreach for expanding the referral network

 

Source: Symantec.com

Running IE v6 on Windows 7 with Symantec Workspace Virtualization

2017-07-27T00:01:09+00:00 August 6th, 2010|Uncategorized|

Wednesday, August 4, 2010

If you are looking for a way to run IE v6 on Windows 7 desktops, take a look at Symantec’s Endpoint Virtualization technologies. The software includes two different modules that are free of charge, including Workspace Virtualization administration and the Browser Selector tools. They are fairly simple to setup and flexible enough to isolate individual applications from the host Windows 7 OS.
Symantec Endpoint Virtualization
http://www.symantec.com/connect/endpoint-virtualization
Entry level pricing starts at $45 per node

Source:  WebInformant.blogspot.com  By: David Strom

Symantec Health Safe

2017-07-27T00:01:09+00:00 August 5th, 2010|Uncategorized|

 

Solution Highlights

Compatibility

  • Complements the existing medical imaging infrastructure
  • Integrates with the hospital’s PACS
  • Does not impact PACS workflow or performance

Security

  • Protects sensitive patient information by deploying stringent security and privacy measures
  • Secures medical image data using proven practices and leading best-of-breed security and availability products

Flexibility

  • Accommodates growth in the size and number of medical images
  • Provides scalability on-demand
  • Supports the introduction of new modalities and imaging centers

Management

  • Enables centralized set up and security administration for sites and users
  • Monitors service performance
  • Reports on storage consumption by modality, provider, site, and date range

Source:  Symantec.com

Top 10 Storage Virtualization Trends of 2010

2017-07-27T00:01:09+00:00 August 4th, 2010|Uncategorized|

The storage area network (SAN) is now an essential technology for many large and midsize enterprises. Over the years SANs have become more sophisticated as vendors have rolled out systems that deliver better storage utilization and functionality. Based on these positive developments, 2010 should bring new and interesting products in several key areas. Here are our top 10 trends to keep an eye on in the coming year — along with the insights of key IT managers who are looking to optimize their existing storage and virtualization strategies.

1. Integration of solid state with rotating media for higher performance and lower energy costs.
Product picks: EMC FAST, Fusion-io, Compellent Storage Center

In an effort to provide the best possible storage solutions, many storage vendors are looking for ways to marry the high performance of solid-data memory to the lower cost of rotating media. As prices continue to drop for all storage technologies — and as hard drives get faster and cheaper — vendors are specifically working to incorporate the latest solid-state drive technologies into traditional SAN arrays. EMC Corp. and Compellent both offer fully automated storage tiering, which is the ability to store data depending on the needs of the application. More-frequently accessed files are stored on faster-performing disks, while less-frequently needed files are moved to tape.

“We’re using the Compellent product as part of our new Savvis Symphony cloud infrastructure service offering,” says Bryan Doerr, CTO of St. Louis-based services provider Savvis Inc. “We like how it has a policy that sits between the application and the array to control how each block of data is written to the physical media, based on frequency of usage.”

Doerr is pleased that these decisions are made automatically. “We don’t have to map tables or keep track of what files are stored where, and that’s a very powerful benefit to us,” he says. “Compellent can move individual blocks from a low-cost and low-performing SATA drive to a solid-state drive for the most-frequently updated data.”

One of the more interesting products is a hardware accelerator plug-in adapter card from Fusion-io that can pre-cache data using solid data memory for SAN arrays and other large-scale storage applications.

2. De-duplication technology — on storage and backups — can help open unused space.
Product picks: EMC Avamar, Symantec/Veritas Netbackup PureDisk, IBM/Tivoli Storage Manager, NetApp FlexClone

De-duplication technologies can provide a powerful way to quickly reclaim storage and minimize backup jobs. When users first start applying these technologies, they’re frequently surprised at how much duplication actually exists. As depicted in Figure 1, with PureDisk software from Symantec Corp., users can drill into a backup job and see that they could save more than 95 percent of their storage by getting rid of duplicate data. This capability offers huge potential savings, particularly when backing up virtual machine (VM) collections and remote offices.

Part of the challenge when using VMs is dealing with the fact that they share many common files inside each virtual image — the boot files for the operating system, the applications and so forth. A de-duplication product can leverage this by making only a single copy of common files.

PureDisk is typical of de-duplication products in that it operates in two different ways. For starters, you can use a PureDisk client or agent that runs on each VM and reports the unique files back to the central PureDisk backup server. And PureDisk can also back up the entire VMware VMDK image file without any agents on the separate VMs. This offloads backup from the ESX server and enables single-pass backups to protect all the files — whether they’re in use or not — that comprise the VM.

“De-duplication gives us big storage savings,” says Chuck Ballard, network and technical services manager at food manufacturer J&B Group, based in St. Michael, Minn. “We have 30 machines, each with a 20GB virtual hard drive, on our SAN. Rather than occupy 600GB, we have about a third of that, and we can grow and shrink our volumes as our needs dictate. We use the

[NetApp] LUN copy utility to replicate our workstation copies off of a master image.”

Ballard stores his images on NetApp’s SAN arrays that have their own utility — called FlexClone — to make virtual copies of the data. “We had EMC and also looked at IBM, but both of them had limited dynamic-provisioning features,” he says, adding that a VMware upgrade that required 4.5TB on J&B Group’s old SAN now uses just 1.5TB on the company’s new storage infrastructure.

3. More granularity in backup and restoration of virtual servers.
Product picks: Vizioncore vRanger Pro, Symantec Netbackup, Asigra Cloud Backup

When combined with de-duplication technologies, more granular backups make for efficient data protection — particularly in virtualized environments where storage requirements quickly balloon and it can take longer than overnight to make backups. Backup vendors are getting better at enabling recoveries that understand the data structure of VM images and can extract just the necessary files without having to restore an entire VM disk image. Symantec Netbackup and Vizioncore vRanger both have this feature, which makes them handy products to have in the case of accidentally deleted configuration or user files. For its part, Asigra Cloud Backup can protect server resources both inside the data center and the cloud.

4. Live migrations and better integration of VM snapshots make it easier to back up, copy and patch VMs.
Product picks: FalconStor FDS, VMware vMotion and vStorage APIs, Citrix XenServer

VMware vStorage API for Data Protection facilitates LAN-free backup of VMs from a central proxy server rather than directly from an ESX Server. Users can do centralized backups without the overhead and hassle of having to run separate backup tasks from inside each VM. These APIs were formerly known as the VMware Consolidated Backup, and the idea behind them is to offload the ESX server from the backup process. This involves taking VM snapshots at any point in time to facilitate the backup and recovery process, so an entire .VMDK image doesn’t have to be backed up from scratch. It also shortens recovery time.

Enhanced VM storage management also includes the ability to perform live VM migrations without having to shut down the underlying OS. Citrix Systems XenServer offers this feature in version 5.5, and VMware has several tools including vMotion and vSphere that can make it easier to add additional RAM and disk storage to a running VM.

Finally, vendors are getting wise to the fact that many IT engineers are carrying smartphones and developing specific software to help them manage their virtualization products. VMware has responded to this trend with vCenter Mobile Access, which allows users to start, stop, copy and manage their VMs from their BlackBerry devices. Citrix also has its Receiver for iPhone client, which makes it possible to remotely control a desktop from an iPhone and run any Windows apps on XenApp 5- or Presentation Server 4.5-hosted servers. While looking at a Windows desktop from the tiny iPhone and BlackBerry screens can be frustrating — and a real scrolling workout — it can also be helpful in emergency situations when you can’t get to a full desktop and need to fix something quickly on the fly.

5. Thin and dynamic provisioning of storage to help moderate storage growth.
Product picks: Symantec/Veritas Storage Foundation Manager, Compellent Dynamic Capacity, Citrix XenServer Essentials, 3Par Inserv

There are probably more than a dozen different products in this segment that are getting better at detecting and managing storage needs. A lot of space can be wasted setting up new VMs on SAN arrays, and these products can reduce that waste substantially. This happens because, when provisioning SANs, users generally don’t know exactly how much storage they’ll need, so they tend to err on the high side by creating volumes that are large enough to meet their needs for the life of the server. The same thing happens when they create individual VMs on each virtual disk partition.

With dynamic-provisioning applications, as application needs grow, SANs automatically extend the volume until it reaches the configured maximum size. This allows users to over-provision disk space, which is fine if their storage needs grow slowly. However, because VMs can create a lot of space in a short period of time, this can also lead to problems. Savvy users will deal with this situation by monitoring their storage requirements with Storage Resource Management tools and staying on top of what has been provisioned and used.

Savvis is using the 3Par InServ Storage Servers for thin provisioning. “We don’t have to worry about mapping individual logical units to specific physical drives — we just put the physical drives in the array and 3Par will carve them up into usable chunks of storage. This gives us much higher storage densities and less wasted space,” says Doerr.

Citrix XenServer Essentials includes both thin- and dynamic-provisioning capabilities, encoding differentials between the virtual disk images so that multiple VMs consume a fraction of the space required because the same files aren’t duplicated. Dynamic workload streaming can be used to rapidly deploy server workloads to the most appropriate server resources — physical or virtual — at any time during the week, month, quarter or year. This is particularly useful for applications that may be regularly migrated between testing and production environments or for systems that require physical deployments for peak user activity during the business cycle.

Compellent has another unique feature, which is the ability to reclaim unused space. Their software searches for unused storage memory blocks that are part of deleted files and marks them as unused so that Windows OSes can overwrite them.

6. Greater VM densities per host will improve storage performance and management.
Product pick: Cisco Unified Communications Server

As corporations make use of virtualization, they find that it can have many applications in a variety of areas. And nothing — other than video — stretches storage faster than duplicating a VM image or setting up a bunch of virtual desktops. With these greater VM densities comes a challenge to keep up with the RAM requirements needed to support them.

In this environment, we’re beginning to see new classes of servers that can handle hundreds of gigabytes of RAM. For example, the Cisco Systems Unified Communications Server (UCS) supports large amounts of memory and VM density (see Figure 2): In one demonstration from VirtualStorm last fall at VMworld, there were more than 400 VMs running Windows XP on each of six blades on one Cisco UCS. Each XP instance had more than 90GB of applications contained in its Virtual Desktop Infrastructure image, which was very impressive.

“It required a perfect balance between the desktops, the infrastructure, the virtualization and the management of the desktops and their applications in order to scale to thousands of desktops in a single environment,” says Erik Westhovens, one of the engineers from VirtualStorm writing on a blog entry about the demonstration.

Savvis is an early UCS customer. “I like where Cisco is taking this platform; combining more functionality within the data center inside the box itself,” Doerr says. “Having the switching and management under the hood, along with native virtualization support, helps us to save money and offer different classes of service to our Symphony cloud customers and ultimately a better cloud-computing experience.”

“If you don’t buy enough RAM for your servers, it doesn’t pay to have the higher-priced VMware licenses,” says an IT manager for a major New York City-based law firm that uses EMC SANs. “We now have five VMware boxes running 40 VMs a piece, and bought new servers specifically to handle this.”

As users run more guest VMs on a single physical server, they’ll find they need to have more RAM installed on the server to maintain performance. This may mean they need to move to a more expensive, multiple-CPU server to handle the larger RAM requirements. Cisco has recognized that many IT shops are over-buying multiple-CPU servers just so they can get enough dual in-line memory module slots to install more RAM. The Cisco UCS hardware will handle 384GB of RAM and not require the purchase of multiple processor licenses for VMware hypervisors, which saves money in the long run.

James Sokol, the CTO for a benefits consultancy in New York City, points out that good hypervisor planning means balancing the number of guest VMs with the expanded RAM required to best provision each guest VM. “You want to run as many guests per host [as possible] to control the number of host licenses you need to purchase and maintain,” Sokol says. “We utilize servers with dual quad-core CPUs and 32GB of RAM to meet our hosted-server requirements.”

A good rule of thumb for Windows guest VMs is to use a gigabyte of RAM for every guest VM that you run.

7. Better high-availability integration and more fault-tolerant operations.
Product picks: VMware vSphere 4 and Citrix XenServer 5.5

The latest hypervisors from VMware and Citrix include features that expedite failover to a backup server and enable fault-tolerant operations. This makes it easier for VMs to be kept in sync when they’re running on different physical hosts, and enhances the ability to move the data stored on one host to another without impacting production applications or user computing. The goal is to provide mainframe-class reliability and operations to virtual resources.

One area where virtualized resources are still playing catch-up to the mainframe computing world is security policies and access controls. Citrix still lacks role-based access controls, and VMware has only recently added this to its vSphere line. This means that in many shops, just about any user can start and stop a VM instance without facing difficult authentication hurdles. There are third-party security tools — such as the HyTrust Appliance for VMware — that allow more granularity over which users have what kind of access to particular VMs. Expect other third-party virtualization management vendors to enter this market in the coming year. (To get an idea of how HyTrust’s software operates, check out the screencast I prepared for them here.)

8. Private cloud creation and virtualized networks — including vendor solutions that offer ways to virtualize your data center entirely in the cloud.
Product picks: Amazon Virtual Private Cloud, VMware vSphere vShield Zones, ReliaCloud, Hexagrid VxDataCenter

Vendors are virtualizing more and more pieces of the data center and using virtual network switches — what VMware calles vShield Zones — to ensure that your network traffic never leaves the virtualized world but still retains nearly the same level of security found in your physical network. For example, you can set up firewalls that stay with the VMs as they migrate between hypervisors, create security policies and set up virtual LANs. Think of it as setting up a security perimeter around your virtual data center.

Amazon has been hard at work with Elastic Computing — its cloud-based, virtualization-hosted storage — and last summer added Virtual Private Cloud to its offerings (see Figure 3). This enables users to extend their VPNs to include the Amazon cloud, further mixing the physical and virtual network infrastructures. It’s also possible to extend any security device on your physical network to cover the Amazon cloud-based servers. The same is true with Amazon Web Services, where customers pay on a usage-only basis with no long-term contracts or commitments.

Microsoft has a series of new projects to extend its Windows Azure cloud-based computing to private clouds. They can be found at here and include ventures such as “Project Sydney,” which enables customers to securely link their on premises-based and cloud servers; AppFabric, which is a collection of existing Windows Azure developer components; and updates to Visual Studio 2010.

Some of these are, or soon will be, available in beta. But like other efforts, more federated security between the cloud and in-house servers will require improvements before these new offerings can be dependably used by most enterprises.

Two new entrants to the cloud computing services arena are Hexagrid Inc. and ReliaCloud, both of which offer a wide range of infrastructure services, including high availability, hardware firewalls and load balancing. With these companies, all cloud servers are assigned private IP addresses and have persistence, meaning that users treat them as real servers even though they’re residing in the cloud. Expect more vendors to offer these and other features that allow IT managers to combine physical and cloud resources.

9. Better application awareness of cloud-based services.
Product picks: Exchange 2010, Sparxent MailShadow
It isn’t just about networks in the cloud, but actual applications too, such as Microsoft Exchange services. The days are coming when you’ll be able to run an Exchange server on a remote data center and failover without anyone noticing. Part of this has to do with improvements Microsoft is making to the upcoming 2010 release of its popular e-mail server software. This also has to do with how the virtualization and third-party vendors are incorporating and integrating disaster recovery into their software offerings. An example of the latter is MailShadow from Sparxent Inc. This cloud-based service makes a “shadow” copy of each user’s Exchange mailbox that’s kept in constant synchronization. There are numerous cloud-based Exchange hosting providers that have offered their services over the past few years, and Microsoft is working on its own cloud-based solutions as well.

10. Start learning the high-end, metric system measurements of storage.
If you thought you knew the difference between gigabytes and terabytes, start boning up on the higher end of the metric scale. SAN management vendor DataCore Software Corp. now supports arrays that can contain up to a petabyte — a thousand terabytes — of data. Savvis sells 50GB increments of its SAN utility storage to its co-location customers, which Doerr says has been very well received. “It’s for customers that don’t want to run their own SANs or just want to run the compute-selected functions,” he states. “There’s a lot of variation across our customers. You have to be flexible if you want to win their business.” Given that it wasn’t too long ago when no one could purchase a 50GB hard drive, he says this shows that, “we’re going to be talking exabytes when it comes to describing our storage needs before too long.” Next up: zettabytes and yottabytes.

Source: Redmondmag.com

Are You Doing All You Can to Protect Your Windows Environment?

2017-07-27T00:01:09+00:00 July 6th, 2010|Uncategorized|

If your midsize business is like most, the current economic climate has stretched your IT staff and resources beyond the limit. At the same time, the risks to your business operations are increasing. According to the recently released Symantec Internet Security Threat Report, malicious code activity is growing at a record pace.

Under these conditions, it’s a real challenge to keep the Microsoft Windows environment you depend on secure, available, and well managed. The following steps can help you better safeguard this environment.

Cover all of your endpoints

Why is it so important to protect every one of your endpoint systems and servers? Just consider the impact of the Conficker worm, which targets users of Windows XP and Windows Vista. Symantec estimates that millions of computers have been infected with this threat since January. Conficker has been credited with creating nothing less than “a secure infrastructure for cybercrime.”

As a result of such threats, companies are scrambling to implement controls that better protect their endpoint systems and the communications travelling between them. But in many cases they’re not doing enough. Symantec’s recent 2009 Storage and Security in SMBs survey found that while small and midsize businesses are familiar with cyber risks and have clearly defined goals for security and storage, a surprisingly high number have yet to take even the most basic steps toward protecting their businesses, such as implementing antivirus or backing up their data.

Reduce complexity

As your IT environment becomes increasingly complex, ask yourself if you have the right tools to manage it. Continually evolving risks, as well as remote systems and mobile users, pose daily challenges.

The solutions you deploy need to be comprehensive but at the same time easy to use. They should reduce complexity, help you maintain a consistent and compliant environment, and reduce IT costs by streamlining and automating tasks. Chances are you’re also supporting more users with fewer resources these days. A secure remote management solution can make it easier for your administrators to automatically troubleshoot and correct technical problems, and to decrease problem resolution time with mobile workers.

Ensure that information is there when you need it

Ensuring that your business-critical data and systems are easily recoverable is essential for keeping your business productive and profitable. Without proper protection, it could take days and require significant expenditures to recover important business information or computer systems from an infrastructure failure, natural disaster, or simple human error. That’s why solutions that enforce and automate backup and recovery processes are needed to keep you protected.

Developing a strategy for restoring data and systems is key. So too is continuous data protection for Microsoft Exchange; after all, your email system is as vital as your phones for communicating.

Get comprehensive protection

The following best-in-class solutions can help protect your Windows environment by keeping data and systems secure, well-managed, and available:

  • Symantec Endpoint Protection combines Symantec AntiVirus technology with advanced threat prevention in a single agent and management console, providing defense against malware for laptops, desktops, and servers. Symantec integrates essential security technologies, increasing protection for Windows environments and helping lower the total cost of ownership.
  • Symantec’s industry-leading client and server management technologies help you protect local and remote systems by simplifying repetitive tasks, deploying updates, and resolving support issues quickly.
  • Symantec backup and recovery software, such as Backup Exec System Recovery and Backup Exec, provides superior protection for critical data and systems in physical and virtual environments, which in turn can keep your business up and running efficiently.
  • Symantec Protection Suite Enterprise Edition provides multiple layers of protection from the market-leading endpoint security, messaging security, data loss prevention, and data and system recovery vendor.

Conclusion

Whether you’re running Windows XP or Vista, contemplating a migration to Vista, or waiting for the upcoming Windows 7, you need to thoroughly protect your current Windows infrastructure now. That means staying ahead of risks, managing your IT environment efficiently, and ensuring that critical information is reliably available.

With a proven track record of protecting Windows environments, Symantec can provide you with the solutions you need to keep your business up, running, and growing no matter what happens.

Source:  Symantec

Survey: SMBs are Getting Serious about Information Protection

2017-07-27T00:01:10+00:00 June 30th, 2010|Uncategorized|

Symantec Study: SMBs are Getting Serious about Information ProtectionSymantec’s 2010 SMB Information Protection Survey found that small and midsized businesses are now making protecting their information their highest IT priority, as opposed to 15 months ago when a high percentage had failed to enact even the most basic safeguards.

SMBs surveyed rank data loss and cyber attacks as their top business risks, ahead of traditional criminal activity, natural disasters and terrorism. They are now spending an average of $51,000 on information protection, including computer security, backup recovery and archiving and disaster preparedness.

Of the SMBs surveyed, 74 percent are somewhat/extremely concerned about losing electronic information. In fact, 42 percent have lost confidential or proprietary information in the past. As a result, 100 percent have seen direct losses such as lost revenue or direct financial costs.

Lost devices is a big issue for SMBs. Almost two-thirds have lost devices such as laptops, smartphones or iPads in the past 12 months and 100 percent have at least some devices that have no password protection and cannot be remotely wiped of their data to protect their confidential business information if lost.

Cyber Attacks are a crucial threat to SMBs. Seventy-three percent of the respondents were victims of cyber attacks in the past year and 100 percent of those SMBs saw losses such as expensive downtime, loss of important corporate data as well as personally identifiable information of customers or employees.

Source: Symantec                                               For Details: http://www.symantec.com/about/news/resources/press_kits/detail.jsp?pkid=smbsurvey2010

Symantec to Acquire VeriSign’s Security Business

2017-07-27T00:01:11+00:00 May 26th, 2010|Uncategorized|

Symantec Corp. (Nasdaq: SYMC) today announced that it has signed a definitive agreement to acquire VeriSign’s (Nasdaq: VRSN) identity and authentication business, which includes the Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) Certificate Services, the Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) Services, the VeriSign Trust Services and the VeriSign Identity Protection (VIP) Authentication Service. The combination of VeriSign’s security products, services and recognition as the most trusted brand online and Symantec’s leading security solutions and widespread distribution will enable Symantec to deliver on its vision of a world where people have simple and secure access to their information from anywhere.

“With the anonymity of the Internet and the evolving threat landscape, people and organizations are struggling to maintain confidence in the security of their interactions, information and identities online. At the same time, people’s personal and professional lives have converged and they want to use their various digital devices to access information wherever they are without jeopardizing their privacy,” said Enrique Salem, president and CEO, Symantec. “At the same time, IT is faced with the challenge of giving users the appropriate access, while ensuring that corporate data is not at risk. We believe the solution to this dilemma lies in the ubiquity of identity-based security. With the combined products and reach from Symantec and VeriSign, we are poised to drive the adoption of identity security as the means to provide simple and secure access to anything from anywhere, to prevent identity fraud and to make online experiences more user-friendly and hassle-free.”

Under the terms of the agreement, Symantec will purchase the specific assets from VeriSign, including the majority stake in VeriSign Japan, for a purchase price of approximately $1.28 billion in cash. Symantec expects the transaction to be 9 cents dilutive to non-GAAP earnings per share in fiscal year 2011, due to the purchase price accounting write down of deferred revenue, and accretive to non-GAAP earnings per share in the September 2011 quarter. The agreement is subject to customary closing conditions, including regulatory approvals, and is expected to close in the September quarter.

Enabling a New Vision of Computing
Through this acquisition, Symantec can help businesses incorporate identity security into a comprehensive framework so that IT can confidently and securely adopt new computing models, from cloud computing to social networking and mobile computing to user-owned devices, that promise operational efficiencies and freedom of choice for their employees and customers. That framework is based on five imperatives that Symantec is enabling as part of its new vision of computing and includes:

  • Identity security: proving that people and sites are who they say they are
  • Mobile and other device security: securing mobile and other devices and the information on them
  • Information protection: protecting information from loss, attack, theft and misuse and ensuring the ability to recover that information
  • Context and relevance: delivering information that is relevant to people in both their personal and professional roles
  • Cloud security: ensuring the secure delivery of applications and information from both public and private clouds

Ease-of-use, speed-of-delivery and user-driven preferences are the new imperatives in today’s workplace. People whose personal and professional lives have converged onto their digital devices increasingly expect the freedom to work from anywhere using their own devices, to use any application and to collaborate with anybody in their social network to effectively get their jobs done and simultaneously live their network-enriched lives.

IT departments struggle to meet user expectations with simple, secure and cost-effective solutions. Cloud computing can provide instantaneous scale and delivery of applications and desktops by enabling businesses to leverage services from the cloud instead of deploying applications on premise. Identity-based security gives IT the assurance that as information moves in and out of the cloud it is always protected — across any device and between the network and devices they control and those that they don’t. The user’s identity drives what information they can access and how it can be used and shared, independent of the device or application.

Creating Mutually Trusted Interactions Online

VeriSign’s SSL Certificate Services provide users with assurance that the websites they are interacting with are legitimate and secure and that their information will be safe when they share it with that site. The VeriSign check mark signifies the authenticity of the websites that users visit and assures them that any sensitive information they share with that site will be encrypted during online transactions. With more than one million web servers using VeriSign SSL certificates, and an infrastructure that processes more than two billion certificate checks daily, VeriSign has the leading share of the SSL market. The addressable market for the server and user authentication segment is estimated to reach $1.6 billion by 2013.

Symantec’s current portfolio and along with assets from VeriSign provide the depth and breadth of technologies to make identity-based security of information more universal and part of a comprehensive security solution. By combining VeriSign’s SSL Certificate Services with Symantec Critical System Protection or Protection Suite for Servers, Symantec will help organizations ensure a higher level of security on their web servers as well as verify that security, providing users with the trust and confidence necessary to do business online.

VeriSign helps organizations validate the identity of users through its VeriSign Identity Protection (VIP) user authentication service that complements the existing Identity Safe capabilities within the Norton products. The cloud-based VIP service helps organizations doing business online confirm the identities of their customers, employees and partners through user-owned digital certificates that reside on a card, token or other device such as a mobile phone, ensuring that they are giving only legitimate users access to their information. VeriSign has already issued more than two million VIP credentials to individuals and has a network of hundreds of merchants.

Through Symantec’s worldwide distribution network and footprint on more than one billion systems – including end-user devices such as laptops, desktops and smart devices, as well as servers – Symantec can facilitate the ubiquity of identity security through digital certificates for both individuals and companies. This is critical to creating mutually trusted interactions online. Merchants have added incentive to join the VIP network if user certificates are widely distributed. More merchants in the VIP network means a more secure and convenient experience for customers moving among member sites. Merchants benefit as well from knowing their customers are also trusted and secure.

Symantec can expand the VIP ecosystem by incorporating user certificates into its Norton-branded consumer products providing a channel through which consumers can easily create secure identities that can be authenticated when they do business online. In addition, the combination of the information classification capabilities of Symantec’s Data Loss Prevention solutions and Data Insight technology along with VeriSign’s identity security services, will allow us to help customers ensure that only authorized users have access to specific information.

Signifying Trust Online

The VeriSign check mark is the most recognized symbol of trust online with more than 175 million impressions every day on more than 90,000 websites in 160 countries. Symantec’s security solutions and the company’s Norton-branded suites protect more than one billion systems and users around the world. With the addition of VeriSign’s security assets, Symantec will become the leading source of trust online. Following the close of the transaction, Symantec plans to incorporate the VeriSign check mark into a new Symantec logo to convey to users that it is safe to communicate, transact commerce and exchange information online.

On-demand Application Delivery

2017-07-27T00:01:11+00:00 April 9th, 2010|Uncategorized|

Definition

Enabling on-demand application delivery involves streamlining or automating the application delivery process to be more responsive to end-user productivity needs and less reliant on IT intervention, without compromising security or manageability.

Challenges

  • Increasing number of mobile and remote users makes traditional application delivery less reliable
  • Increasing mobility of users between computers complicates application delivery and license management
  • The fluidity of virtual desktops and virtual machines requires an equally flexible delivery technology

Symantec Solution: Endpoint Virtualization

Provision and protect endpoint environments instantly using streaming, virtualization, and desktop broker technologies to reduce costs and increase productivity

  • Avoid downloads and installations and improve application delivery and streaming
  • Support local execution while maintaining central control
  • Allow users to obtain authorized applications, on-demand, without requiring IT intervention
  • Enable delta-only application upgrades or back-grades to reduce network bandwidth usage
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