Office 365 Integration with SCCM…..

2017-11-20T02:02:27+00:00 November 20th, 2017|Azure, blog, Configuration Manager, Micrsoft Cloud Solution Provider, Office 365, System Center|

Deploying Office or Office 365 has traditionally been a challenge in most corporate environments.  The file types have changed, components have been added/removed, content size isn’t the most manageable, and the amount of business processes that rely on the productivity suite of products requires close management of the deployment to ensure that work can continue once the newer version is deployed.

Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM) — as of version 1602 — integrates with Office 365 to offer the ability to deploy the Office 365 productivity suite natively with SCCM.  The feature is called Office 365 Client Management and is found in the Software Library of the SCCM Console.  Here’s a snapshot of what it looks like:

On the left, you have your Office 365 Folder with Office 365 Updates included.  When in the folder view, you can see a summary of the number of O365 clients and their versions.  If you notice the scroll-bar indicates there’s more to see…

The different sections can be summarized as such:

  1. Number of O365 Clients in total
  2. The breakdown and summarization of the different versions in the environment
  3. A button which will initiate a wizard to create an O365 client deployment package
  4. A chart indicating the number of systems running different languages of O365
  5. A button to create an Automatic Deployment Rule
  6. Another option to create client settings (These are standard SCCM Client settings, nothing special pertaining to O365)
  7. The number of systems configured to the different update Channels for Office 365 client management
  8. If ADRs were created, they would show in this section

I’ve had some great experiences working with the Office 365 Client management integration with SCCM.  The ability to create a single package to support multiple different languages has taken my packaging time and reduced it to minutes.

In addition to providing a built-in package creation utility, SCCM also manages and services O365 packages moving forward.  The updates are all provided through SCCM’s native Software Update technology but are provided to you in a separate node in the console so that you can view only the updates pertaining to the 365 clients in your environment.  This makes it very easy to identify required and installed updates for your managed systems.

As for what’s needed to manage updates for O365 within SCCM:

Requirements for using Configuration Manager to manage Office 365 client updates

To enable Configuration Manager to manage Office 365 client updates, you need the following (summarized from link above):

  • System Center Configuration Manager, update 1602 or later
  • An Office 365 client – Office 365 ProPlus, Visio Pro for Office 365, Project Online Desktop Client, or Office 365 Business
  • Supported channel version for Office 365 client. For more details, see Version and build numbers of update channel releases for Office 365 clients
  • Windows Server Update Services (WSUS) 4.0  — You can’t use WSUS by itself to deploy these updates. You need to use WSUS in conjunction with Configuration Manager
  • On the computers that have the Office 365 client installed, the Office COM object is enabled

All in all, I have to say that I’m very impressed with the integration of Office 365 Client Management into SCCM.  SCCM has been a very powerful tool and to add the ability to manage the productivity suite natively in SCCM will ensure that admins in large environments can spend more time managing than packaging.

Good Job Microsoft!

Powershell: Script to Easily Find Objects in the SCCM Console

2017-07-27T00:01:04+00:00 January 9th, 2013|Uncategorized|

Recently, I had a need to delete an SCCM advertisement in the SCCM 2007 R2 console, in order to ensure it didn’t run on any of my test machines.  Now, I knew that it wouldn’t run, because it was not being advertised to any collections of which my test machine was a member.  But the advertisement was only a test, and I was trying to clean up after myself.

According to Microsoft (link:, the way to delete an advertisement from the SCCM console is to drill down through the console (System Center Configuration Manager / Site Database / Computer Management / Software Distribution / Advertisements) and right-click -> Delete the advertisement.  Normally, this is a pretty straightforward procedure…  IF you know where your advertisement is located.

You see, the SCCM console in which I was working divided the advertisements into sub folders based on the Publishers name, and I could not find a folder for the Advertisement I was trying to delete.



Furthermore, subdividing the Advertisements as such also rendered the “Look For” search field in the console pretty useless; I would have to “Look For” my advertisement in every folder!

SCCM reports can be pretty helpful, and I was able to run a report that gave me just about every piece of data about the advertisement I wanted to delete – except the path to it; the information critical for deleting the advertisement.

A quick Google search led me to this link:  Here, I found the Powershell script that helped me find my elusive advertisement.

The only inputs for this powerful and very useful script are the name of your SCCM site server, and the SCCM object ID, which can easily be found through the “All Advertisements” report in SCCM.  As it turns out, the folder that contained my advertisement had been accidentally moved under another folder. 

It’s great when you find the perfect tool for the job, as I did in this case.  I hope you find it as useful as I did. I intend to keep this one around for future use. 

Thanks, Tao!


Interactive Services Detection Dialog Suppression…

2017-07-27T00:01:04+00:00 November 7th, 2012|Uncategorized|

I finally got to the bottom of the “Interactive Services Detection” dialog that appeared when running my SCCM advertisement.  The reason, in hindsight, makes total sense…

I was running my .MSI with a /qb-! switch, which means “display basic modal dialogs to the logged on user when running, but hide the ‘Cancel’ button”.  My SCCM program did not have the “Allow users to interact with this program” check-box marked.  Thus, when the advertisement ran, I would see the Interactive Services Detection dialog appear — because Windows Installer was trying to display the install dialogs to the logged on user.

To suppress the “Interactive Services Detection” dialog (below) that appears when Windows detects a service running as “Session 0” (that’s a zero) user…


…Simply mark the “Allow users to interact with this program” check-box under Run Mode on the “Environment” tab of your program.



And that should do it!  Thanks to fellow Coreteker Voltaire for suggesting that I look at this program setting…

Troubleshooting the Interactive Services Detection can be challenging.  Unfortunately, if you are working in an enterprise environment that is still deploying legacy applications, you are likely to encounter it.  So if you are deploying an .MSI through SCCM and you are not running it silently (with a “/qn” switch), be sure to mark the “Allow users to interact with this program” check-box.