The death of non-verifiable subject alternate names in certificates…

2017-07-27T00:01:02+00:00 April 23rd, 2014|Uncategorized|

If you’re not aware, 3rd party certificate providers (Verisign, etc.) won’t be allowed to issue certs with non-verifiable Subject Alternative Names (SANs) or Subjects with so-called “internal” server names in the near future.  For example, server.local, servername, server.lan, etc. are *not* valid inclusions in certificates; basically any name that is not verifyable against a public registrar.  Any 3rd party cert with an internal server name that you acquire now will be marked for expiry on November 1, 2015.  Existing certs will be revoked on October 1, 2016 – assuming the provider is following guidelines. 

This can be problematic going forward when it comes to designing Active Directory services for new Forests, since best practices have historically been to try and avoid split-brain/split-horizon DNS, if possible.  Going forward, any new AD designs must include considerations for domains that end in .com or .net, in order to avoid this issue.

And at this very moment, I’m on an engagement that has a non-internet routable AD Forest name; so I am planning for this situation.

If you end up in this situation and you need SANs with internal server names (read: the FQDN of an Exchange Client Access Server), the good news is that DigiCert has a tool and some steps to follow to work around this.  For additional information, please see these great explanations from DigiCert:

Internal Server Names
New gTLDs
DigiCert Internal Name Tool
Redirect Internal Exchange Domains to use External Domains

Microsoft is writing their concerns and tips about this situation into some of their Knowledge Base articles as well (see the “More Information” section in this support guide).  Now hang on…  that doesn’t mean re-work your entire DNS and AD infrastructure.  Instead, they recommend creating an internal DNS zone that matches your external zone and setting up the appropriate Exchange records.  You leave your existing DNS internal namespace alone.  That’s one way to do things if you walk in to *any* environment with a .local (and the like) internal DNS name.

For *new* environments, however, if the customer is using SomeCompanyDomain.com externally, then set up the new AD infrastructure as SomeCompanyDomain.net or SomeCompanyDomain.biz and get past this silliness.  Just add the names to the Subject Alternative Name on the cert, set up the internal Exchange URLs appropriately, and you’re done.

This change can have ramifications beyond Exchange, folks.  Short-names are also disallowed, so you can’t even put things like MYWEBSERVER or MYSHAREPOINTSITE as a SAN now.

Yes, this means I feel this is something *very* important for us to keep in mind as we work with AD, Exchange, Sharepoint, etc.  You’re going to find certs that expire Nov 1, 2015… and that’s less than 18 months from this writing.  That’ll be here before you know it, and we all need to be prepared for these situations. 

If you’re in charge of potentially-affected systems, consider yourself warned!  And if you’re someone who doesn’t have time in your busy schedule to handle this, let us know if we can help you…

Dell’s EqualLogic has been awarded “Best Storage System

2017-07-27T00:01:08+00:00 January 14th, 2011|Uncategorized|

Dell continues to blaze new ways to deliver better iSCSI SAN performance and scalability. The market leader (in terms of delivered performance) added dynamic storage tiering to the Dell EqualLogic PS6010XVS iSCSI SAN via solid-state disks (SSDs), whose data is determined by firmware I/O analysis. This firmware tracks accesses to blocks and moves the most frequently accessed sectors to the SSD, in much the same way hybrid disks do on PCs. Our benchmarks showed this design brought improved performance that matched particularly well with the needs of virtualization. Improved support for VMware vSphere added to the superior performance of the Dell SAN, which peaked at an eye-popping 250MBps on writes.

http://www.infoworld.com/d/infoworld/infoworlds-2011-technology-the-year-award-winners-285&current=5&last=1#slideshowTop

Source: Infoworld.com

Simplifying IT with Dell EqualLogic

2017-07-27T00:01:09+00:00 August 23rd, 2010|Uncategorized|

The Dell EqualLogic PS Series is a family of virtualized iSCSI storage arrays that combine intelligence and automation with fault tolerance to provide simplified administration, rapid deployment, enterprise performance and reliability, and seamless scalability. The PS Series high performance storage arrays deliver a range of capacity points from 400 GB to 48 TB in either a 3U or 4U chassis. PS Series arrays can be combined to create a virtualized SAN that scales up to 768 TB under a single management interface.

Ease of use • Intelligent, automated management helps minimize tedious administrative tasks

• From box to operating SAN in minutes

• Monitor petabytes of storage across dozens of SANs from a single console

  

  

Scalability

• Modular design allows growth when needed

• Online expansion between hardware generations

• Linear scalability — scale capacity and performance together

• Manage a growing pool of storage from one single user interface

• Thin provisioning to increase space efficiency for optimal capacity utilization

• Expand overall group capacity by mixing pools of 6000 and 6500 arrays

  

  

Enterprise efficiency

• Addition of 10GbE supports high-performance, high-bandwidth applications such as data warehouses and streaming media

• Maximize your IT investments with an end-to-end unified fabric data center encompassing servers, EqualLogic storage and Networking

• Enterprise level virtualized storage that matches virtualized server environments

• Support for multi-tiered application designs with automated tiering included in hybrid models  (6000XVS & 6010XVS)

  Enterprise performance • Exceptional performance for both sequential and transactional applications with linear scalability as arrays are added

• Automated, real-time load balancing across drives, RAID sets, connections, cache and controllers for optimized performance and resource utilization

• Pooling capability enables appropriate service levels for individual applications

  

  

Reliability

• Fault tolerant, fully redundant dual controller

• Designed for 99.999% availability

• Enterprise-class RAID protection

• Full hardware redundancy — hot swappable controllers, fans, power supplies, disks

  

  

Affordability

• All-inclusive enterprise features and functionality with no additional software licenses to purchase

• Easy connection via iSCSI

• Automated features help to eliminate highly specialized administrative costs

• Adopt 10GbE and run both 1GbE and 10GbE in the same environment without de-valuing legacy equipment

• EqualLogic SANs have the lowest TCO of common storage array architectures—fully 1/3 to 1/2 the total cost of competitors over a five year period2

 

Coretek Services is a Michigan based Systems Integration and IT consulting company that not only works with virtualization infrastructure such as VMware, Citrix XenServer, and Microsoft Hyper-V, but also is a Michigan based reseller of Dell EqualLogic SANs.  Please contact us today for any virtualization requirements, storage requirements, or specific Dell EqualLogic SAN needs.

Source:  Dell.com

Top 10 Storage Virtualization Trends of 2010

2017-07-27T00:01:09+00:00 August 4th, 2010|Uncategorized|

The storage area network (SAN) is now an essential technology for many large and midsize enterprises. Over the years SANs have become more sophisticated as vendors have rolled out systems that deliver better storage utilization and functionality. Based on these positive developments, 2010 should bring new and interesting products in several key areas. Here are our top 10 trends to keep an eye on in the coming year — along with the insights of key IT managers who are looking to optimize their existing storage and virtualization strategies.

1. Integration of solid state with rotating media for higher performance and lower energy costs.
Product picks: EMC FAST, Fusion-io, Compellent Storage Center

In an effort to provide the best possible storage solutions, many storage vendors are looking for ways to marry the high performance of solid-data memory to the lower cost of rotating media. As prices continue to drop for all storage technologies — and as hard drives get faster and cheaper — vendors are specifically working to incorporate the latest solid-state drive technologies into traditional SAN arrays. EMC Corp. and Compellent both offer fully automated storage tiering, which is the ability to store data depending on the needs of the application. More-frequently accessed files are stored on faster-performing disks, while less-frequently needed files are moved to tape.

“We’re using the Compellent product as part of our new Savvis Symphony cloud infrastructure service offering,” says Bryan Doerr, CTO of St. Louis-based services provider Savvis Inc. “We like how it has a policy that sits between the application and the array to control how each block of data is written to the physical media, based on frequency of usage.”

Doerr is pleased that these decisions are made automatically. “We don’t have to map tables or keep track of what files are stored where, and that’s a very powerful benefit to us,” he says. “Compellent can move individual blocks from a low-cost and low-performing SATA drive to a solid-state drive for the most-frequently updated data.”

One of the more interesting products is a hardware accelerator plug-in adapter card from Fusion-io that can pre-cache data using solid data memory for SAN arrays and other large-scale storage applications.

2. De-duplication technology — on storage and backups — can help open unused space.
Product picks: EMC Avamar, Symantec/Veritas Netbackup PureDisk, IBM/Tivoli Storage Manager, NetApp FlexClone

De-duplication technologies can provide a powerful way to quickly reclaim storage and minimize backup jobs. When users first start applying these technologies, they’re frequently surprised at how much duplication actually exists. As depicted in Figure 1, with PureDisk software from Symantec Corp., users can drill into a backup job and see that they could save more than 95 percent of their storage by getting rid of duplicate data. This capability offers huge potential savings, particularly when backing up virtual machine (VM) collections and remote offices.

Part of the challenge when using VMs is dealing with the fact that they share many common files inside each virtual image — the boot files for the operating system, the applications and so forth. A de-duplication product can leverage this by making only a single copy of common files.

PureDisk is typical of de-duplication products in that it operates in two different ways. For starters, you can use a PureDisk client or agent that runs on each VM and reports the unique files back to the central PureDisk backup server. And PureDisk can also back up the entire VMware VMDK image file without any agents on the separate VMs. This offloads backup from the ESX server and enables single-pass backups to protect all the files — whether they’re in use or not — that comprise the VM.

“De-duplication gives us big storage savings,” says Chuck Ballard, network and technical services manager at food manufacturer J&B Group, based in St. Michael, Minn. “We have 30 machines, each with a 20GB virtual hard drive, on our SAN. Rather than occupy 600GB, we have about a third of that, and we can grow and shrink our volumes as our needs dictate. We use the

[NetApp] LUN copy utility to replicate our workstation copies off of a master image.”

Ballard stores his images on NetApp’s SAN arrays that have their own utility — called FlexClone — to make virtual copies of the data. “We had EMC and also looked at IBM, but both of them had limited dynamic-provisioning features,” he says, adding that a VMware upgrade that required 4.5TB on J&B Group’s old SAN now uses just 1.5TB on the company’s new storage infrastructure.

3. More granularity in backup and restoration of virtual servers.
Product picks: Vizioncore vRanger Pro, Symantec Netbackup, Asigra Cloud Backup

When combined with de-duplication technologies, more granular backups make for efficient data protection — particularly in virtualized environments where storage requirements quickly balloon and it can take longer than overnight to make backups. Backup vendors are getting better at enabling recoveries that understand the data structure of VM images and can extract just the necessary files without having to restore an entire VM disk image. Symantec Netbackup and Vizioncore vRanger both have this feature, which makes them handy products to have in the case of accidentally deleted configuration or user files. For its part, Asigra Cloud Backup can protect server resources both inside the data center and the cloud.

4. Live migrations and better integration of VM snapshots make it easier to back up, copy and patch VMs.
Product picks: FalconStor FDS, VMware vMotion and vStorage APIs, Citrix XenServer

VMware vStorage API for Data Protection facilitates LAN-free backup of VMs from a central proxy server rather than directly from an ESX Server. Users can do centralized backups without the overhead and hassle of having to run separate backup tasks from inside each VM. These APIs were formerly known as the VMware Consolidated Backup, and the idea behind them is to offload the ESX server from the backup process. This involves taking VM snapshots at any point in time to facilitate the backup and recovery process, so an entire .VMDK image doesn’t have to be backed up from scratch. It also shortens recovery time.

Enhanced VM storage management also includes the ability to perform live VM migrations without having to shut down the underlying OS. Citrix Systems XenServer offers this feature in version 5.5, and VMware has several tools including vMotion and vSphere that can make it easier to add additional RAM and disk storage to a running VM.

Finally, vendors are getting wise to the fact that many IT engineers are carrying smartphones and developing specific software to help them manage their virtualization products. VMware has responded to this trend with vCenter Mobile Access, which allows users to start, stop, copy and manage their VMs from their BlackBerry devices. Citrix also has its Receiver for iPhone client, which makes it possible to remotely control a desktop from an iPhone and run any Windows apps on XenApp 5- or Presentation Server 4.5-hosted servers. While looking at a Windows desktop from the tiny iPhone and BlackBerry screens can be frustrating — and a real scrolling workout — it can also be helpful in emergency situations when you can’t get to a full desktop and need to fix something quickly on the fly.

5. Thin and dynamic provisioning of storage to help moderate storage growth.
Product picks: Symantec/Veritas Storage Foundation Manager, Compellent Dynamic Capacity, Citrix XenServer Essentials, 3Par Inserv

There are probably more than a dozen different products in this segment that are getting better at detecting and managing storage needs. A lot of space can be wasted setting up new VMs on SAN arrays, and these products can reduce that waste substantially. This happens because, when provisioning SANs, users generally don’t know exactly how much storage they’ll need, so they tend to err on the high side by creating volumes that are large enough to meet their needs for the life of the server. The same thing happens when they create individual VMs on each virtual disk partition.

With dynamic-provisioning applications, as application needs grow, SANs automatically extend the volume until it reaches the configured maximum size. This allows users to over-provision disk space, which is fine if their storage needs grow slowly. However, because VMs can create a lot of space in a short period of time, this can also lead to problems. Savvy users will deal with this situation by monitoring their storage requirements with Storage Resource Management tools and staying on top of what has been provisioned and used.

Savvis is using the 3Par InServ Storage Servers for thin provisioning. “We don’t have to worry about mapping individual logical units to specific physical drives — we just put the physical drives in the array and 3Par will carve them up into usable chunks of storage. This gives us much higher storage densities and less wasted space,” says Doerr.

Citrix XenServer Essentials includes both thin- and dynamic-provisioning capabilities, encoding differentials between the virtual disk images so that multiple VMs consume a fraction of the space required because the same files aren’t duplicated. Dynamic workload streaming can be used to rapidly deploy server workloads to the most appropriate server resources — physical or virtual — at any time during the week, month, quarter or year. This is particularly useful for applications that may be regularly migrated between testing and production environments or for systems that require physical deployments for peak user activity during the business cycle.

Compellent has another unique feature, which is the ability to reclaim unused space. Their software searches for unused storage memory blocks that are part of deleted files and marks them as unused so that Windows OSes can overwrite them.

6. Greater VM densities per host will improve storage performance and management.
Product pick: Cisco Unified Communications Server

As corporations make use of virtualization, they find that it can have many applications in a variety of areas. And nothing — other than video — stretches storage faster than duplicating a VM image or setting up a bunch of virtual desktops. With these greater VM densities comes a challenge to keep up with the RAM requirements needed to support them.

In this environment, we’re beginning to see new classes of servers that can handle hundreds of gigabytes of RAM. For example, the Cisco Systems Unified Communications Server (UCS) supports large amounts of memory and VM density (see Figure 2): In one demonstration from VirtualStorm last fall at VMworld, there were more than 400 VMs running Windows XP on each of six blades on one Cisco UCS. Each XP instance had more than 90GB of applications contained in its Virtual Desktop Infrastructure image, which was very impressive.

“It required a perfect balance between the desktops, the infrastructure, the virtualization and the management of the desktops and their applications in order to scale to thousands of desktops in a single environment,” says Erik Westhovens, one of the engineers from VirtualStorm writing on a blog entry about the demonstration.

Savvis is an early UCS customer. “I like where Cisco is taking this platform; combining more functionality within the data center inside the box itself,” Doerr says. “Having the switching and management under the hood, along with native virtualization support, helps us to save money and offer different classes of service to our Symphony cloud customers and ultimately a better cloud-computing experience.”

“If you don’t buy enough RAM for your servers, it doesn’t pay to have the higher-priced VMware licenses,” says an IT manager for a major New York City-based law firm that uses EMC SANs. “We now have five VMware boxes running 40 VMs a piece, and bought new servers specifically to handle this.”

As users run more guest VMs on a single physical server, they’ll find they need to have more RAM installed on the server to maintain performance. This may mean they need to move to a more expensive, multiple-CPU server to handle the larger RAM requirements. Cisco has recognized that many IT shops are over-buying multiple-CPU servers just so they can get enough dual in-line memory module slots to install more RAM. The Cisco UCS hardware will handle 384GB of RAM and not require the purchase of multiple processor licenses for VMware hypervisors, which saves money in the long run.

James Sokol, the CTO for a benefits consultancy in New York City, points out that good hypervisor planning means balancing the number of guest VMs with the expanded RAM required to best provision each guest VM. “You want to run as many guests per host [as possible] to control the number of host licenses you need to purchase and maintain,” Sokol says. “We utilize servers with dual quad-core CPUs and 32GB of RAM to meet our hosted-server requirements.”

A good rule of thumb for Windows guest VMs is to use a gigabyte of RAM for every guest VM that you run.

7. Better high-availability integration and more fault-tolerant operations.
Product picks: VMware vSphere 4 and Citrix XenServer 5.5

The latest hypervisors from VMware and Citrix include features that expedite failover to a backup server and enable fault-tolerant operations. This makes it easier for VMs to be kept in sync when they’re running on different physical hosts, and enhances the ability to move the data stored on one host to another without impacting production applications or user computing. The goal is to provide mainframe-class reliability and operations to virtual resources.

One area where virtualized resources are still playing catch-up to the mainframe computing world is security policies and access controls. Citrix still lacks role-based access controls, and VMware has only recently added this to its vSphere line. This means that in many shops, just about any user can start and stop a VM instance without facing difficult authentication hurdles. There are third-party security tools — such as the HyTrust Appliance for VMware — that allow more granularity over which users have what kind of access to particular VMs. Expect other third-party virtualization management vendors to enter this market in the coming year. (To get an idea of how HyTrust’s software operates, check out the screencast I prepared for them here.)

8. Private cloud creation and virtualized networks — including vendor solutions that offer ways to virtualize your data center entirely in the cloud.
Product picks: Amazon Virtual Private Cloud, VMware vSphere vShield Zones, ReliaCloud, Hexagrid VxDataCenter

Vendors are virtualizing more and more pieces of the data center and using virtual network switches — what VMware calles vShield Zones — to ensure that your network traffic never leaves the virtualized world but still retains nearly the same level of security found in your physical network. For example, you can set up firewalls that stay with the VMs as they migrate between hypervisors, create security policies and set up virtual LANs. Think of it as setting up a security perimeter around your virtual data center.

Amazon has been hard at work with Elastic Computing — its cloud-based, virtualization-hosted storage — and last summer added Virtual Private Cloud to its offerings (see Figure 3). This enables users to extend their VPNs to include the Amazon cloud, further mixing the physical and virtual network infrastructures. It’s also possible to extend any security device on your physical network to cover the Amazon cloud-based servers. The same is true with Amazon Web Services, where customers pay on a usage-only basis with no long-term contracts or commitments.

Microsoft has a series of new projects to extend its Windows Azure cloud-based computing to private clouds. They can be found at here and include ventures such as “Project Sydney,” which enables customers to securely link their on premises-based and cloud servers; AppFabric, which is a collection of existing Windows Azure developer components; and updates to Visual Studio 2010.

Some of these are, or soon will be, available in beta. But like other efforts, more federated security between the cloud and in-house servers will require improvements before these new offerings can be dependably used by most enterprises.

Two new entrants to the cloud computing services arena are Hexagrid Inc. and ReliaCloud, both of which offer a wide range of infrastructure services, including high availability, hardware firewalls and load balancing. With these companies, all cloud servers are assigned private IP addresses and have persistence, meaning that users treat them as real servers even though they’re residing in the cloud. Expect more vendors to offer these and other features that allow IT managers to combine physical and cloud resources.

9. Better application awareness of cloud-based services.
Product picks: Exchange 2010, Sparxent MailShadow
It isn’t just about networks in the cloud, but actual applications too, such as Microsoft Exchange services. The days are coming when you’ll be able to run an Exchange server on a remote data center and failover without anyone noticing. Part of this has to do with improvements Microsoft is making to the upcoming 2010 release of its popular e-mail server software. This also has to do with how the virtualization and third-party vendors are incorporating and integrating disaster recovery into their software offerings. An example of the latter is MailShadow from Sparxent Inc. This cloud-based service makes a “shadow” copy of each user’s Exchange mailbox that’s kept in constant synchronization. There are numerous cloud-based Exchange hosting providers that have offered their services over the past few years, and Microsoft is working on its own cloud-based solutions as well.

10. Start learning the high-end, metric system measurements of storage.
If you thought you knew the difference between gigabytes and terabytes, start boning up on the higher end of the metric scale. SAN management vendor DataCore Software Corp. now supports arrays that can contain up to a petabyte — a thousand terabytes — of data. Savvis sells 50GB increments of its SAN utility storage to its co-location customers, which Doerr says has been very well received. “It’s for customers that don’t want to run their own SANs or just want to run the compute-selected functions,” he states. “There’s a lot of variation across our customers. You have to be flexible if you want to win their business.” Given that it wasn’t too long ago when no one could purchase a 50GB hard drive, he says this shows that, “we’re going to be talking exabytes when it comes to describing our storage needs before too long.” Next up: zettabytes and yottabytes.

Source: Redmondmag.com

Integrating Dell EqualLogic SANS with Citrix XenServer

2017-07-27T00:01:11+00:00 May 21st, 2010|Uncategorized|

INTEGRATING DELL EQUALLOGIC SANS WITH CITRIX XENSERVER

VIRTUALIZED STORAGE TO OPTIMIZE THE XENSERVER ENVIRONMENT

Server virtualization can offer strategic value to organizations in a number of arenas. By creating an abstraction layer between operating systems and physical hardware, IT administrators can consolidate server capacity, parcel out computing resources as needed, and streamline system provisioning and deployment, all while improving service levels and network security. Server virtualization also facilitates support for multiple operating systems, broadened choices among vendors and solutions, and employee empowerment across organizations, regardless of location.

In implementing virtualization solutions, however, IT managers often overlook a major opportunity: the integration of the virtualization platform and the shared storage backend. The result of this oversight: two critical components that effectively operate as discrete silos, creating new inefficiencies and increasing administrative workloads.

SAN AND SERVER MANAGEMENT VIA A SINGLE CONSOLE

To address this problem, Citrix and Dell have introduced the next generation of virtualization and storage with the Citrix XenServer Adapter for Dell EqualLogic PS Series SAN arrays. Available as part of Citrix XenServer 5.0 Dell Edition, this module allows IT administrators to hand off storage virtualization operations from the server virtualization software over to the EqualLogic SAN, for effective handling and superb overall performance.

The adapter integrates EqualLogic control interfaces directly into the XenCenter Management Client, helping improve overall system performance, enabling more efficient disk utilization, and realizing more completely the benefits of storage consolidation. The integration also leverages the automated features designed into both the XenServer and the PS Series arrays, reducing administrator workloads and increasing efficiency over more conventional, stove-piped deployments. 

Through this partnered integration, Dell and Citrix offer organizations the full benefit of virtualization, including centralized storage, live migration, high availability, realtime streaming and improved management of workload and life-cycle costs.

VIRTUALIZED STORAGE FOR THE VIRTUALIZED ENVIRONMENT

With their ease-of-use, storage virtualization, and automation features, EqualLogic SANs provide a flexible means for managing storage resources, gracefully scaling, and reducing overall complexity, resulting in low total costs of ownership (TCO). When deployed within a XenServer environment, EqualLogic SANs can simplify the tasks and routines by which applications and data are stored and protected. Unlike other SAN platforms, the EqualLogic PS Series arrays share processor and storage resources dynamically, and perform load-balancing continuously, allowing more efficient implementation of these vital resources.

The Citrix XenServer Adapter for Dell EqualLogic capitalizes on this intelligence and goes even further, allowing simple management of these resources — storage provisioning, intelligent backup, rapid recovery, and capacity growth — live in production environments, with no application interruption or downtime. The XenServer Direct Storage Adapter enables IT administrators to perform unique EqualLogic capabilities through the Citrix XenCenter Management Client, automating the creation and assignment of dedicated storage volumes to each Virtual Machine (VM), without the manual work required by classic direct-storage mapping technologies.

As an integrated virtualization solution, XenServer and EqualLogic maintain high operating efficiency by delegating such advanced capabilities as Thin Provisioning, Fast Cloning, and Automated Snapshots to the EqualLogic SAN. Thin Provisioning helps IT administrators control costs by dedicating only the storage capacity needed in the short term, and maintaining unallocated storage in a common pool for later use by applications or user groups as disk resources are actually consumed. Fast Cloning lets storage administrators create copies of entire volumes (e.g., virtual drives or LUNs) as a background process, without disrupting network operations. Once created, clones can be used to accelerate the provisioning and deployment of standardized VMs, as well as to test new applications, configurations or procedures. Snapshots are space-efficient, point-in-time captures of storage volumes that can be created without disrupting network operations, for use in backing up or testing data.

In addition, XenServer supports iSCSI multipath I/O (MPIO) and simplified disaster recovery, two strategic tools for improving business continuity even in the event of network failures or other outages. MPIO support allows multiple networkpaths — e.g., separate subnetworks or VLANS — for both the SAN arrays and the virtualization servers, as a means of both improving performance and safeguarding against Ethernet switch failures or other network problems. Disaster recovery tools apply snapshot and fast cloning technologies to the processes of initial VM placement, the real-time movement of VMs via XenMotion, and automatic high availability.

CITRIX XENSERVER DELL EDITION: A POWERFUL VIRTUALIZATION SOLUTION

Dell and Citrix have partnered to bring virtualization ready platforms for today’s dynamic and growing data centers. With the 64-bit open-source Xen hypervisor at its core, Citrix XenServer Dell Edition is a powerful virtualization solution that enables efficient resource consolidation, utilization, dynamic provisioning, and integrated systems management. XenServer Dell Edition has a small footprint and is optimized to run from an internal flash storage in Dell PowerEdge servers.

EqualLogic SANs deliver the benefits of consolidated networked storage in a self-managing, iSCSI storage area network that is affordable and easy to use, regardless of scale. By eliminating complex tasks and enabling fast and flexible storage provisioning, EqualLogic solutions can reduce the costs of storage acquisition and ongoing operations.

Citrix XenServer Dell Edition is certified and fully supported by Dell for select server and storage configurations. Citrix XenServer Dell Edition comes pre-installed with Dell OpenManage Server Administrator, which enables systems management right out of the box without any additional need to install an agent on the host.

Source: www.equallogic.com

Five Reasons To Make Dell EqualLogic PS Series Your Storage Consolidation Solution

2010-05-17T16:56:29+00:00 May 17th, 2010|Uncategorized|

1. CENTRALIZE STORAGE AND REDUCE ADMINISTRATIVE OVERHEAD

The PS Series’ unique peer storage architecture consolidates all storage resources into an easy-to-manage tiered pool of storage, securely accessed by servers across a standard Ethernet network. The PS Group Manager provides a single, intuitive administrative interface, accessible from anywhere on the network.

2. SIMPLIFY IT OPERATIONS AND REDUCE TOTAL IT EXPENDITURES

The all-inclusive feature set of the Dell EqualLogic PS Series makes advanced virtualization and data protection features available to enterprises of all sizes, without breaking the bank. Automatic system expansion, data protection, and tiering functions minimize administrative tasks even as storage needs grow over time.

3. ONLINE SCALABILITY WITHOUT DOWNTIME

Bringing additional storage online is truly seamless; additional disk and controller resources are automatically brought online without disrupting applications accessing the storage pool. Performance scales linearly as workloads are automatically load balanced, spreading data across all active disks, arrays, and interface ports. In addition, built-in thin-provisioning functionality improves flexibility and scalability, reducing administrative costs and making the Dell EqualLogic “pay-as-you-grow” strategy seamless for applications.

4. INCREASE AVAILABILITY AND PROTECT CRITICAL DATA SETS

PS Series arrays are built for enterprise deployments, providing fully redundant, hot-pluggable system architecture that minimizes administrative tasks even as storage needs grow over time. Volumes are RAID-protected, and through advanced system and disk monitoring, faults can be quickly recognized and addressed without downtime. Low overhead snapshots and remote replication enable you to simply create a virtually unlimited number of space-efficient point-in-time copies at primary and remote sites for quick recovery from disk or backup to tape.

5. CONSOLIDATE STORAGE ASSETS ACROSS MULTIPLE OS ENVIRONMENTS

Dell EqualLogic PS Series supports initiators across all major operating systems. Gigabit Ethernet NICs and HBAs provide high performance, multi-path access to centralized storage assets. Boot-from-SAN and virtualized desktop capabilities allow system disks to be totally removed from distributed server and desktop assets, benefiting from the high availability and data protection features offered by the SAN.

For more information, please visit http://www.equallogic.com/resourcecenter/multimediacenter.aspx.


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